Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

 

  • 2. The Importance of Cultural Background in Intercultural Communication
    In every form of communication the key to understanding is the meaningful context. Communicators make statements assuming that the other party has the same context of the statement. But in the case of communicators from different cultural backgrounds this is not always necessarily the case. If one understands the language and the words it is not sure that they understand the message, too. Understanding the culture can help communicators understand the context and the message. It might sound easy to achieve but in fact it is not. First of all it is not easy to define culture as such. Originally the world culture was used by ancient Roman orator Cicero and he used it for the cultivation of the soul. Culture can be defined broadly and it can affect many aspects of human life. In 1952 Kroeber and Kluckhohn collected more than 150 definitions of the term. “The essence of culture is not what is visible on the surface. It is the shared ways groups of people understand and interpret the world.” [35]
    Culture has an impact on business in different forms: there are international managers who operate on several different premises [18]. Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner (1993) wrote that there is a presumption that internalisation will lead to a common culture all over the world, and tastes and markets, thus culture are becoming more and more similar.
    “Whereas communication is a process, culture is the structure through which the communication is formulated and interpreted. Culture deals with the way people live.” [24] In intercultural communication different cultures interact and might influence each other, so if you
    93

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3. 

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9. 

are not familiar with the given culture at least partly, it can hinder or deteriorate successful communication. 

If people have to function in another culture it is natural that they experience difficulties. Brislin and Cushner (1996) wrote about areas of difficulties such as: dealing with anxiety whose origins are typically vague, learning new culturally appropriate behaviours, having to make decisions based on less information than one is accustomed to, recognising new clues to the role and how one is expected to interface with that role. 

When one communicates with people from another culture there might be communication barriers which are obstacles to effective communication. Chaney and Martin (2014) enlisted the following handicaps: (p. 12) physical (time, environment, comfort and needs, and physical medium), cultural (ethnic, religious, and social differences), perceptual (viewing what is said from your own mindset), motivational (the listener’s mental inertia), experiential (lack of similar life happenings), emotional (personal feelings of the listener), linguistic (different languages spoken by the speaker and listener or use of a vocabulary beyond the comprehension of the listener), nonverbal (non-word messages) and competition (the listener’s ability to do other things rather than hear the communication). 

Cultural differences obviously influence the different styles of management. Hanges et al (2016) conducted research on cross-cultural leadership and they found that culture moderates the outcomes resulting from different styles of leadership. They found that different leadership styles can be more effective if the followers are culturally homogenous at least to a certain extent. 

Artiz and Walker (2010) studied how member participation in meetings changes when teams are formed on multicultural basis using discourse analysis and observational methods. They found that there were significant differences in the discourse patterns of U.S.-born English speakers and their Asian-speaking counterparts when speaking English and working in mixed groups. Their research showed that group composition affected communication patterns. 

Shieh et al (2009) found that failures suffered by multinational enterprises generally result from neglecting cultural differences and managers must be cross-culturally trained to face the challenges of global competition. Tutar et al (2014) found that multinational company managers are aware of cultural differences and they have the skills to turn cultural differences into advantages as today multinational companies have workforce from different cultures, and managers need to take these differences into consideration in their activities. 

In the case of international companies intercultural communication differences can cause serious problems, Laurig (2011) established that differences in styles of communication could slow down the process of decision making and weaken social ties or they could make working processes more difficult. Levitt (2014) tried to explore cultural factors affecting international team dynamics and effectiveness and he found that cultural differences created more frustrations and barriers to effective teamwork than benefits. 

94 

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3. 

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9. 

Global economic crises have multicultural effects. Oliveira’s findings (2013) confirmed that even in crisis communication cultural diversity had a significant effect and understanding cultural differences was an important requirement in our society.

1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Zoetermeer NL

23-03-2019

 

Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

1. Intercultural Communication 1)

It was Edward T. Hall who first used this term in 1959 for communication between persons of different cultures. Today it is universally accepted that different skills are needed to be able to communicate successfully with someone from another culture [12]. 

Seelye (1993) enlisted six basic skills forming intercultural competences: cultivating curiosity about another culture and empathy toward its members, recognizing that role expectations and other social variables such as age, sex, social class, religion, ethnicity, and place of residence affect the way people speak and behave, realizing that effective communication requires discovering the culturally conditioned images that are evoked in the minds of people when they think, act, and react to the world around them; recognizing that situational variables and convention shape our behaviour in important ways, understanding that people generally act the way they do because they are using options their society allows for satisfying basic physical and psychological needs, and that cultural patterns are interrelated and tend to support need satisfaction mutually, developing the ability to evaluate the strength of a generalization about the target culture, and to locate and organize information about the target culture from the library, the mass media, people, and personal observation. 

Several authors mentioned that intercultural competences are needed in the era of globalisation and they tried to define what they were. Chen and Starosta (1997) used the term intercultural sensitivity and they wrote that with the appearance of global society people need to adapt to the unfamiliar and there is a strong demand for greater understanding, sensitivity and competency among people from differing cultural backgrounds. To behave effectively and appropriately in intercultural interactions people need intercultural competence: self-esteem, self-monitoring, open-mindedness, empathy, interaction involvement and suspending judgement. Hunter et al (2006) used the phrase global competence, which is the capability to understand one’s own culture and identify cultural differences to other cultures. 

Within the wide spectrum of intercultural competences the intercultural communication competence plays a significant role. Waldeck et al (2012) defined six communication competencies important within the contemporary business environment. Spitzberg (2000) created a “Model of Intercultural Communication Competence” and he enlisted more empirically derived factors. Makela et al (2007) did research on the interpersonal similarity in multinational corporations. The different intercultural competencies are the following: 

  • 􏰀  ability to adjust to different cultures [32]
  • 􏰀  social adjustment [32]
  • 􏰀  awareness of implications of cultural differences [32]
  • 􏰀  national-cultural similarity [23]
  • 􏰀  cultural empathy [32]
  • 􏰀  cultural interaction [32]
    92

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3. 

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9. 

  • 􏰀  communication competence [32]
  • 􏰀  communication apprehension [32]
  • 􏰀  communication of enthusiasm, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit [38]
  • 􏰀  relationship and interpersonal communication skills [38]
  • 􏰀  mediated communication [38]
  • 􏰀  intergroup communication [38]
  • 􏰀  nonverbal communication [38]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal flexibility [32]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal harmony [32]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal interest [32]
  • 􏰀  speaking and listening [38]
  • 􏰀  a shared language [23]
  • 􏰀  ability to deal with psychological stress [32]
  • 􏰀  cautiousness [32]
    Steele and Plenty (2015) defined intercultural communication competence as “one’s knowledge of appropriate communication practices as well as effectiveness at adapting to the surroundings in a communication situation.”                        1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Zoetermeer NL

19-01-2019

 

Was das Leben sinnvoll macht: Bedürfnisse achten – Werte schätzen-2

November 28, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Kommunikation, Management, Psychologie, Uncategorized 

Was das Leben sinnvoll macht: Bedürfnisse achten – Werte schätzen 2)

Grundbedürfnisse 2: Abraham Maslow

Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) war ein Mitbegründer der „Humanistischen Psychologie“. Nach ihm wird der Mensch in seinem Verhalten von hierarchisch strukturierten Bedürfnissen geleitet. Diese lassen sich als Pyramide darstellen.

  1. Physiologische Bedürfnisse: Die wichtigsten sind Hunger, Durst und Sexualität. Wenn diese konstant befriedigt werden, verlieren sie an Bedeutung.
  2. Sicherheitsbedürfnisse: Bedürfnis nach Stabilität, Schutz, Freiheit von Angst und Chaos, Struktur, Ordnung, Gesetz. Menschen wünschen sich eine vorhersagbare Welt. Chaos und Ungerechtigkeit verunsichern sie.
  3. Zugehörigkeits- und Liebesbedürfnisse: Ergebnisse soziologischer Studien bestätigen die negativen Auswirkungen von Entwurzelung aus Bezugsgruppen (Wegzug der Familie in einen anderen Ort; Auflösung der Familie z.B. durch Scheidung; Emigration, Aussiedler)
  4. Wertschätzungs- und Geltungsbedürfnis: Das Bedürfnis umfasst zum einen den Wunsch nach Stärke, Leistung und Kompetenz, zum anderen das Verlangen nach Prestige, Status, Ruhm und Macht. Darauf gründet sich das Selbstwertgefühl eines Menschen.
    Bedürfnis nach Selbstverwirklichung (Wachstumsbedürfnis, Selbstaktualisierung): Damit spricht Maslow das Streben nach der Entwicklung der eigenen Persönlichkeit an. Die Effekte dieses Strebens sind von Person zu Person sehr unterschiedlich. Es zeigt sich darin eine “Vorwärtstendenz” im menschlichen Wesen. Der Mensch drängt danach, die Einheit seiner Persönlichkeit zu erleben, er ist auf der Suche nach Wahrheit. Er drängt nach “vollem Sein”: Heiterkeit, Freundlichkeit, Mut, Ehrlichkeit, Liebe, Güte …

2) Günter W. Remmert: http://www.seminarhaus-schmiede.de/pdf/wertelust.pdf

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers
Email: beniers@mac.com
28-11-2015

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Was das Leben sinnvoll macht: Bedürfnisse achten – Werte schätzen-1

November 27, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Communication, Management, Psychology, Uncategorized 

 

Was das Leben sinnvoll macht: Bedürfnisse achten – Werte schätzen 1)

Aber mein Leben, mein ganzes Leben, wie auch immer es sich äußerlich gestalten mag, jeder Augenblick meines Lebens wird jetzt nicht zwecklos sein wie bisher, sondern zu seinem alleinigen,bestimmten Zweck das Gute haben. Denn das liegt jetzt in meiner Macht: meinem Leben die Richtung auf das Gute zu geben! (Lew Nikolajewitsch Graf Tolstoi, Anna Kerenina).

Glücklicherweise ist es normaler geworden, über Werte zu sprechen. Sie gehören zu den grundlegenden und grundgebenden Orientierungen. An ihnen messen wir, was den Einsatz lohnt. Sie bringen Klarheit, Kraft und Sinn in unser Tun und Lassen.
Werte sind unsere tiefsten Überzeugungen, Ideale und Einstellungen. Sie bilden den Maßstab für unser Denken, Reden und Handeln. Sie sind Teil unseres Gewissens. Sie sind der Motor, der uns antreibt und motiviert. Und sie sind die Fenster, aus denen wir schauen, wenn wir Entscheidungen treffen und andere Menschen und uns selbst einschätzen.
Obgleich wir ständig bewerten und Werte unser Tun massiv beeinflussen, so wirken sie doch eher untergründig. Sie sind uns als entscheidende Größe oft gar nicht bewusst. Doch unsere Sicht auf die Welt wird durch sie gefärbt. Sie sind der Kompass, mit dessen Hilfe wir unseren Lebensweg gehen.
Diesen Kompass neu zu eichen, wird immer wichtiger. Denn immer weniger finden wir selbstverständlich gemeinsame Regeln und Werte vor. Die Vielfalt möglicher Denk-, Bewertungs- und Lebensformen wächst beständig.
Wir machen uns miteinander auf die Suche nach unseren persönlichen Werten. Woraus speisen sie sich? Wie stehen sie zueinander? Wie können wir Übertreibungen vermeiden? Wie können wir wertschätzender mit eigenen Fähigkeiten und Bedürfnissen umgehen? Und wie den Mitmenschen mehr Anerkennung, Achtung und Freundlichkeit zeigen?

1) Günter W. Remmert: http://www.seminarhaus-schmiede.de/pdf/wertelust.pdf

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers
Email: beniers@mac.com
27-11-2015

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Offene Kommunikation (1)

Offene Kommunikation

Einführung

Berühmt ist die Aussage von Paul Watzlawick: ”Der Mensch kann nicht nicht kommunizieren.”
Man kann nicht nicht kommunizieren, denn jede Kommunikation (nicht nur mit Worten) ist Verhalten und genauso wie man sich nicht nicht verhalten kann, kann man nicht nicht kommunizieren.

Sobald zwei Personen sich gegenseitig wahrnehmen können, kommunizieren sie miteinander, da jedes Verhalten kommunikativen Charakter hat. Watzlawick versteht Verhalten jeder Art als Kommunikation. Da Verhalten kein Gegenteil hat, man sich also nicht nicht verhalten kann, ist es auch unmöglich, nicht zu kommunizieren.


Erfolgreiche Kommunikation zwischen Menschen erfordert offene Kommunikation. Und offene Kommunikation gestaltet man u.a. mit Hilfe der Dialogführung. Viele Leute gehen dabei von der Annahme aus, dass der Dialog dazu dient, Argumente auszutauschen. Das ist aber nicht der Fall. Der Dialog dient nicht zum Argumentieren, sondern zur Informationsvermittlung. Bekanntlich fängt Kommunikation mit Menschen aus anderen Kulturen mit Informationsvermittlung an. Erst später (wenn man sich besser kennt und wenn ein gewisses Vertrauensklima vorhanden ist) geht man gegebenenfalls zum Argumentieren über.
Die Praxis zeigt, dass interkulturelle Dialogführung, das heißt verbale und/oder nonverbale Informationsvermittlung zwischen Menschen aus unterschiedlichen Kulturen, zu (gravierenden) Missverständnissen führen kann. Es gibt bekanntlich große Unterschiede in der Art der Informationsvermittlung zwischen Kulturen, wie zum Beispiel zwischen aktiven und reaktiven Kulturen, zwischen individualistischen und kollektivistischen Kulturen und zwischen Low-Kontext- und High-Kontext-Kulturen. Darum beschäftigen wir uns in diesem Kapitel u.a. mit dem Phänomen des Dialogs.

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers
Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

01-03-2015
Email: info@beniers-consultancy.com

Notwendige Einstellung: Kultureller Relativismus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notwendige Einstellung: Kultureller Relativismus (1)

Möglichkeiten zum Zusammentreffen mit anderen Kulturen und mit Ansichten, die in ihnen ihren Ursprung haben, wachsen ständig. Reisen und Medien geben Einsicht in die Relativität unserer eigenen Kulturstandards. Es stellt sich heraus, dass unsere Wahrnehmung der Realität keineswegs universell ist. Es gibt keinen Grund, zu glauben, dass unsere Normen und Werte besser sind als die, an denen eine andere Kultur festhält.

Es gibt keine signifikanten Standards, um Kulturen hierarchisch anzuordnen. Was zu einer Zeit an einem Ort richtig ist, kann an einem anderen Ort falsch sein. Anthropologische Daten zeigen an, dass sogar moralische Richtigkeit oder Falschheit von Ort zu Ort variieren. Deshalb gibt es keine Rechtfertigung, eine Gruppe als besser/höher oder schlechter/niedriger als eine andere einzuschätzen.

Wenn man eine fremde Kultur beobachtet, ist ein gewisser vorübergehender Ausschluss des Urteilens notwendig. Man muss immer daran denken, dass die eigene Perspektive die Tendenz hat, subjektiv zu sein, und dass eine Kultur nur von innen beurteilt werden kann. Andererseits kann es sehr wertvoll sein, Fremdperspektiven auf die eigene Kultur zu projizieren.

Kultureller Relativismus kann allerdings zu einem schwierigen ethischen Problem führen. Wenn eine Kultur nur von innen beurteilt werden kann, wie sieht es dann mit Kulturen aus, die beispielsweise das Töten von Menschen billigen?

 Tipp

Kultureller Relativismus

  • Keine Kultur ist besser als irgendeine andere Kultur.
  • Man soll vorurteilsfrei andere Kulturen beobachten.

Kulturen lassen sich kategorisieren, d. h. nach bestimmten Dimensionen einordnen. Hier sind es vor allem die Dimensionen von Hofstede und Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner, die sich sehr gut für eine erste Einordnung eignen. Auch die Unterscheidung in monochrone und polychrone Kulturen ermöglicht eine gute Einschätzung.

(1) C.J.M. Beniers. Managerwissen Kompakt. Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Hanser Verlag München/Wien 2006. ISBN: 3-446-40220-9.

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

© Copyright 2012

31-05-2012

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer

Niederlande

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 636180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

Kultur

April 15, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Uncategorized 

slide0109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kultur(1)

Es gibt unzählige Kulturdefinitionen. Eine  moderne  Definition lautet:   „Kultur ist die mentale Programmierung des Geistes”.

Entsprechend  dieser Ansicht ist Kultur die mentale  Programmierung, die jedes Mitglied einer gegebenen Gemeinschaft, Organisation oder Gruppe erlebt und entsprechend der er voraussichtlich folgerichtig handeln wird.

Kultur, so verstanden, enthält eine Menge „alltäglicher und gewöhnlicher Dinge des Lebens: begrüßen, essen, zeigen oder verbergen von Emotionen, Körperdistanz zu anderen, lieben oder Körperhygiene“. Im Licht der obigen Definition ist es auch nicht schwieirig, das Phänomen des Kulturschocks zu erklären: Er ist die mentale Reaktion auf fremde Software.

Neben obenerwähnter Definition gibt es noch zahllose andere. Alle Definitionen aber betrachten Kultur als ein Orientierungssystem, das allen Mitgliedern einer Gemeinschaft vertraut ist. Dieses Orientierungssystem beeinflusst das Wahrnehmen, Denken, Werten und Handeln aller  Mitglieder einer Gemeinschaft. Kultur als Orientierungssystem strukturiert ein spezifisches Handlungsfeld  für Individuen, die sich der Gesellschaft zugehörig fühlen. Zentrale Merkmale des kulturspezifischen Orientierungssystems lassen sich als Kulturstandards definieren.

Unter Kulturstandards versteht man diejenigen Werte, Normen, Regeln innerhalb einer Kultur, die sich auf Denken, Wahrnehmen, Urteilen und Handeln ihrer Mitglieder auswirken.

Eigenes und fremdes Verhalten wird auf der Grundlage dieser Kulturstandards beurteilt und reguliert. Zentrale Kulturstandards einer Kultur können in einer anderen Kultur völlig fehlen oder nur von peripherer Bedeutung sein. Verschiedene Kulturen können ähnliche Kulturstandards aufweisen, die aber von unterschiedlicher Bedeutung sind und unterschiedlich weite Toleranzbereiche aufweisen. In diesem Zusammenhang kann das Problem unterschiedlichen Bedeutung der Pressefreiheit zwischen China einerseits und Europa und den USA andererseits erwähnt werden.

Kultur ist ein kollektives Phänomen, da man sie zumindest mit Menschen teilt, die im selben sozialen Umfeld leben. Kultur ist erlernt. Wir machen uns Kultur zu eigen, indem wir sie erlernen. Das findet in der Familie statt, in der Schule, in Jugendverbänden, Sportvereinen, am Arbeitsplatz und in der Gesellschaft.

Die mentale Programmierung des Menschen kann in drei Bereiche unterteilt werden:

Erstens: Persönlichkeit

Darunter versteht man die einzigartige persönliche Kombination mentaler Programme eines Individuums, die es mit keinem anderen Menschen teilt.

Zweitens: Kultur

Kultur ist erlernt und nicht ererbt. Kultur leitet sich aus unserem sozialen Umfeld ab, nicht aus unseren Genen.

Drittens: Natur

Die menschliche Natur ist das, was allen Menschen gemeinsam ist. Sie stellt die universelle Ebene in unserer mentalen Software dar. Wir haben sie mit unseren Genen ererbt. Wie z.B. die menschliche Fähigkeit, Angst, Freude zu empfinden, die Fähigkeit, die Umgebung zu beobachten und mit anderen Menschen darüber zu sprechen. Die Art und Weise aber, wie man seine Angst, Freude usw. zum Ausdruck bringt, ist kulturbedingt.

Wie entwickelt sich nun Kultur?

In der Anfangsphase gibt es grundlegende Orientierungs- und Verhaltensmuster.

In der zweiten Phase schlagen diese in konkretisierten Wertvorstellungen nieder.

Diese Wertvortellungen nun müssen über längere Zeit lebendig gehalten werden. Dazu bilden sich Symbolsysteme als Darstellungs-und Vermittlungsmuster heraus.

Wie manifestiert sich Kultur?

Bei den Manifestationen der Kultur unterscheidet man:

Erstens: Symbole:

Symbole sind Worte, Gesten, Objekte mit bestimmter Bedeutung, die nur von denjenigen verstanden werden, die der gleichen Kultur angehören. Zum Beispiel die Symbole beim Militär (Zapfenstreich) oder im Bereich des Sports. Oder die Worte einer Fachsprache, ebenso wie Kleidung, Haartracht, Flaggen usw.

Zweitens: Helden:

Helden sind Personen (tot oder lebend), auch Comic-Figuren, die Eigenschaften besitzen, die in einer Kultur hoch angesehen sind. Sie dienen als Verhaltensvorbilder. Z.B. der Verkäufer des Monats oder der beste Professor des letzten Studienjahres. Und die Comic-Figur Asterix in Frankreich und Snoopy in den USA.

Drittens: Rituale:

Rituale sind kollektive Tätigkeiten, die zum Erreichen der angestrebten Ziele eigentlich überflüssig sind, innerhalb einer Kultur aber als sozial notwendig gelten: sie werden also um ihrer selbst willen ausgeübt. Z.B. Formen des Grüßens, soziale und religiöse Zeremonien.

Viertens: Werte:

Werte gehören zu den ersten Dingen, die ein Kind lernt, nicht bewusst, sondern implizit. Entwicklungspsychologen gehen davon aus, dass das Grundwertesystem bei den meisten Kindern im Alter von zehn Jahren fest verankert ist und Änderungen nach diesem Alter schwierig sind. Viele der eigenen Werte sind dem betreffenden Menschen nicht bewusst, weil er sie so früh im Leben erworben hat. Man kann darum nicht über sie diskutieren, und für Außenstehende sind sie nicht direkt wahrnehmbar. Man kann lediglich aus der Art und Weise, wie Menschen unter verschiedenen Umständen handeln, auf sie schließen.

Werte sind Ideen, Orientierungen oder Verhaltensweisen, die vom Einzelnen, einer Gruppe, Gemeinschaft oder innerhalb von sozialen Systemen, das heißt Kulturkreis, Gesellschaft, Organisationen für wichtig, gut und erstrebenswert angesehen bzw. geschätzt, respektiert und gelebt werden.

Werte beeinflussen Handlungen und Urteile jenseits von unmittelbaren Zielen und über eine konkrete Situation hinaus. Werte bezeichnet man als eine allgemeine Neigung, bestimmte Umstände anderen vorzuziehen. Werte sind Gefühle mit einer Orientierung zum Plus- oder zum Minuspol hin: böse-gut, schmutzig-sauber, rational-irrational, natürlich-unnatürlich.

Man unterscheidet folgende Werte:

Erstens: Materielle Werte:

Diese besitzen einen bloß relativen Wert als Mittel zur Erreichung übergeordneter Ziele. Sie gewinnen ihre Wertqualität durch Bezug auf höhere Werte. Z.B. Kapital, sichere Autos, nutzerfreundliche IT usw.

Zweitens: Ideelle Werte:

Sie haben einen intrinsischen Wert und werden um ihrer selbst willen erstrebt oder respektiert. Sie können auch der Erreichung anderer Ziele, höherer Werte oder Güter dienen. Beispiel: Wissen, Ästhetik, Wohlbefinden, Kunst, Tugenden, Freundschaft, Religion.

Drittens: Ethische Werte:

Diese stellen höchste Güter oder letzte Ziele menschlicher Existenz dar. Sie dienen als Maßstab zur Konkretisierung bzw. Begründung ethischer Prinzipien, Normen und Regeln. Beispiel: Freiheit, Würde, Gerechtigkeit, Frieden, Gemeinwohl, Gesundheit, Weisheit.

Viertens: Soziale Werte:

Wichtigster sozialer Wert in:

Dänemark: Selbstrespekt

Fünftens: Normen

Auch Normen zählen zu den Manifestationen einer Kultur. Normen definieren mögliche Verhaltensweisen in einer sozialen Situation und geben Verhaltensregelmäßigkeiten an. Sie sind gesellschaftlich und kulturell bedingt und daher in den Kulturen verschieden und auch mit der gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung wandelbar.

Normen sind konkrete Vorschriften, die das Verhalten betreffen. Die Einhaltung von Normen wird durch Sanktionen garantiert (Belohnung oder Bestrafung). Diese Sanktionen können durch die Mitmenschen erfolgen oder durch Personen in einer bestimmten Machtposition Beispiel: Wir halten Verkehrssicherheit für sehr wichtig. Das ist ein allgemein anerkannter Wert. Aus diesem Wert leitet sich als Norm ein Tempolimit z. B. in den Straßen in der Innenstadt ab.

Normen sind von den meisten Gesellschaftsmitgliedern (sozialen Akteuren) akzeptierte und vertretene Vorstellungen, Handlungsmaximen und Verhaltensmaßregeln wie z. B., dass man beim Essen nicht schmatzt, dass man sich den Hosenschlitz in einem unbeobachteten Moment zuzieht, oder dass man alte Menschen nicht anrempelt. Soziale Normen strukturieren so die Erwartungen der Interaktionspartner in einer Situation und machen das Handeln und Reagieren in einem gewissen Maße vorhersagbar, sie reduzieren daher Komplexität im sozialen Miteinander, engen aber die Verhaltensmöglichkeiten auch ein.

Normen werden häufig aus ethisch-moralischen Zielvorstellungen, das heißt aus Werten abgeleitet. Verhält sich jemand entsprechend einer Norm, ohne dabei bewusst an die mit dieser Norm verbundenen Sanktionen zu denken, so hat er die Norm  internalisiert. Normen dienen dazu, dass soziales Handeln vereinfacht wird, durch die Existenz von Normen wird es möglich Erwartungen über das Verhalten anderer Personen zu bilden.

Bei den Normen unterscheidet man:

a. funktionale Normen

Dabei gilt die Funktion einer technischen Einrichtung oder eines Organismus als Maßstab dafür, was als “normal” zu gelten hat. Wenn eine Grippewelle eine Bevölkerung zu 60% durchseucht hat, mag das “statistisch” normal sein. Der menschliche Körper ist aber in seiner Funktion beeinträchtigt und hat keine “Normalfunktion”.

b. ideale oder moralische Normen

Dabei wird ein idealer oder moralischer Wert erstellt, an dem gemessen wird, was “normal” ist. Die sportlichen Normen für die Olympiaqualifikation sind ein Beispiel für ideale Normen. Die sittlichen und christlichen Normen sind ein Beispiel für moralische Normen.

c. Sittliche Normen

Eine sittliche Norm setzt dem Handeln Wertmaßstäbe, z. B. “Behandle deinen Mitmenschen so, wie du selbst behandelt werden willst”. Für mündige Menschen gewinnen Handlungsnormen nicht schon dadurch Gültigkeit, dass sie gegeben sind, sondern ihr Verpflichtungscharakter ergibt sich nach verantwortlicher Prüfung. Eine Norm, die nicht auf einem Wert gründet, hat keine sittliche Bindekraft.

Zum Schluss  möchte ich noch einige Bemerkungen zum kulturellen Relativismus machen.

Möglichkeiten zum Zusammentreffen mit anderen Kulturen und mit Ansichten, die in ihnen ihren Ursprung haben, wachsen ständig. Reisen und Medien geben Einsicht in die Relativität unserer eigenen Kulturstandards. Wichtig dabei ist, dass unsere Wahrnehmung der Realität keineswegs universell ist. Es gibt also keinen Grund, zu glauben, dass unsere Normen und Werte besser sind als die, an denen eine andere Kultur festhält.

Wenn man eine fremde Kultur beobachtet, ist ein gewisser vorübergehender Ausschluß des Urteilens notwendig. Man muss immer daran denken, dass die eigene Perspektive die Tendenz hat, subjektiv zu sein, und dass eine Kultur nur von innen beurteilt werden kann.

Kultureller Relativismus kann allerdings zu einem schwierigen ethischen Problem führen. Wenn eine Kultur nur von innen beurteilt werden kann, wie sieht es dann mit Kulturen aus, die beispielsweise das Töten von Menschen billigen?

(1) C.J.M. Beniers. Managerwissen Kompakt. Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Hanser Verlag München/Wien 2006. ISBN: 3-446-40220-9.

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

© Copyright 2009

15-04-2009

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer
The Netherlands

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 6 36180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Webseite: www.beniers-consultancy.com

 


  • Categories

  • Archiv