Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

4. Some other areas of misunderstandings in intercultural communication caused by cultural differences

In successful intercultural communication participants need to speak a common language properly, they need to be aware of the cultural differences and should take them into consideration, but in some situations misunderstandings can arise even if the participants fulfil the above-mentioned requirements. According to Larkey (1996) in culturally diverse workgroups misunderstanding may come from misinterpretations of intent, organisational practices, or interpersonal reactions, as well as simple miscommunication of ideas or values.

There are different areas of language use which might cause problems in intercultural communication. One of these areas is the language of numbers. In written communication there are differences in using decimal points in different parts of the world. In some countries they use the decimal point to separate thousands (in most European countries) while in the United States they use the comma. Another example is the use of billion and milliard for numbers with nine zeros. In some countries they use the phrase billion (US, Britain etc.) and in other countries they use milliard for the same number (Russia, Italy, Germany etc.) [7].

Although the metric system was designed to be universal all over the world, the conversion of scientific units into their SI equivalents might be problematic. There are different systems of units in use in various areas of science. For example the British system of units, known as imperial units and the similar US Customary Units, which are legal in the USA and Canada [6].

There are other aspects which are in close relation with cultural differences which can be the inward, non-verbal intercultural communication. They are gestures, facial expressions, interpersonal distance, eye contact, touch and silence. Some important areas of causing misunderstanding are listed below, but they are just examples, of course there can be a lot more [31].

The prevention or handling of possible misunderstandings can be led by philosophy and useful methodology in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Existing mentor programs, for example can protect intergeneration conflicts [3].

One of the important areas to avoid future misunderstandings is the attitude toward time because it can vary from culture to culture. For example people in Latin America, Southern Europe, and the Middle East have different attitudes toward punctuality and interruptions than people in the United States, England, Germany or Switzerland [37].

Also, the layout of the office and the arrangement of furniture play an important role in different cultures. This can convey power and show status [28].

97

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3.

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9.

In an intercultural business context even using colours can cause problems because there are some cultural differences associated with colours. Just to mention one example: black is the colour of mourning in many European countries and in the United States, too. However, in Japan and some other countries it is white, and on the African continent red has similar connotations [2].

Another important area of nonverbal communication is clothing. In some cultures dressing conservatively or casually reflects different messages and can be associated with social status or wealth [24].

When doing business internationally you must apply the correct interpersonal space during conversations. There can be differences in the appropriate space in different cultures. For example people in the United States need more space than people in Latin America, but the Japanese need even more space [25].

Body language is an important part of the communication process in any culture. This may take different forms, for example facial expressions, gestures and posture. In many cases gestures depend on the culture and the context, and to avoid misinterpretations use them with care in international business settings [22]. Another difference can be found in using touches and body contacts in intercultural business communications. Shaking hands is accepted in many cultures, hugging on the other hand may seem inappropriate in some cultures. In countries like Italy, Greece, Spain touching is tolerated whereas in Hong Kong for example, any type of physical contact is best avoided [7].

In some business cultures people favour direct eye contact, for example in the US, Great Britain, Eastern Europe, while in other cultures eye contact is avoided, and for example in the Middle East there is a prolonged eye contact which can be uncomfortable for those who are not accustomed to it. There can be cultural variations concerning the eye contact with women in different cultures. If you are not familiar with these customs you can misinterpret the eye contact [4].

In many countries in business meetings there is a given amount of “small talk” before gettingdown to business. But this might be a minefield for intercultural communicators as there aredifferences concerning the topics of this “small talk”: it is appropriate to talk about some topicsin some countries but they are considered inappropriate in other countries. Problematic topics could be politics, religion and family situations [26].

The role of silence as a form of nonverbal communication is different in different cultures. Some might interpret it as a sign of agreement, while others as a lack of interest [15].

These examples illustrate that communicators should take many aspects of intercultural business communication into consideration, which requires intercultural competencies, preparation and experience. These skills can be improved and nowadays multinational companies realise how important they are and they are willing to invest in improving them.

98

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3.

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9.

5. Conclusion

Intercultural communication is determined by sociocultural, and psychological considerations The success or failure of intercultural communication can depend on different factors but we can agree that culture has a very important role in it. There is a large variety of skills that communicators need to develop in intercultural communication and the more they have the better communicators they can be. The lack of a common language can act as a barrier to successful intercultural communication but this is not the only factor. There are a lot of other areas which might cause problems in intercultural communication so it is advisable to be well prepared before you communicate with people from other cultures. . Moreover, there is a growing interest in intercultural communication in international business life. Investment in exploring and developing the intercultural communication potential of employees is no longer a challenge, but should be a part of duties in everyday business operation, and also in strategical thinking.

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

NL Zoetermeer, 30-05-2019

 

Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

1. Intercultural Communication 1)

It was Edward T. Hall who first used this term in 1959 for communication between persons of different cultures. Today it is universally accepted that different skills are needed to be able to communicate successfully with someone from another culture [12]. 

Seelye (1993) enlisted six basic skills forming intercultural competences: cultivating curiosity about another culture and empathy toward its members, recognizing that role expectations and other social variables such as age, sex, social class, religion, ethnicity, and place of residence affect the way people speak and behave, realizing that effective communication requires discovering the culturally conditioned images that are evoked in the minds of people when they think, act, and react to the world around them; recognizing that situational variables and convention shape our behaviour in important ways, understanding that people generally act the way they do because they are using options their society allows for satisfying basic physical and psychological needs, and that cultural patterns are interrelated and tend to support need satisfaction mutually, developing the ability to evaluate the strength of a generalization about the target culture, and to locate and organize information about the target culture from the library, the mass media, people, and personal observation. 

Several authors mentioned that intercultural competences are needed in the era of globalisation and they tried to define what they were. Chen and Starosta (1997) used the term intercultural sensitivity and they wrote that with the appearance of global society people need to adapt to the unfamiliar and there is a strong demand for greater understanding, sensitivity and competency among people from differing cultural backgrounds. To behave effectively and appropriately in intercultural interactions people need intercultural competence: self-esteem, self-monitoring, open-mindedness, empathy, interaction involvement and suspending judgement. Hunter et al (2006) used the phrase global competence, which is the capability to understand one’s own culture and identify cultural differences to other cultures. 

Within the wide spectrum of intercultural competences the intercultural communication competence plays a significant role. Waldeck et al (2012) defined six communication competencies important within the contemporary business environment. Spitzberg (2000) created a “Model of Intercultural Communication Competence” and he enlisted more empirically derived factors. Makela et al (2007) did research on the interpersonal similarity in multinational corporations. The different intercultural competencies are the following: 

  • 􏰀  ability to adjust to different cultures [32]
  • 􏰀  social adjustment [32]
  • 􏰀  awareness of implications of cultural differences [32]
  • 􏰀  national-cultural similarity [23]
  • 􏰀  cultural empathy [32]
  • 􏰀  cultural interaction [32]
    92

International Journal of Engineering and Management Sciences (IJEMS) Vol. 2. (2017). No. 3. 

DOI: 10.21791/IJEMS.2017.3.9. 

  • 􏰀  communication competence [32]
  • 􏰀  communication apprehension [32]
  • 􏰀  communication of enthusiasm, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit [38]
  • 􏰀  relationship and interpersonal communication skills [38]
  • 􏰀  mediated communication [38]
  • 􏰀  intergroup communication [38]
  • 􏰀  nonverbal communication [38]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal flexibility [32]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal harmony [32]
  • 􏰀  interpersonal interest [32]
  • 􏰀  speaking and listening [38]
  • 􏰀  a shared language [23]
  • 􏰀  ability to deal with psychological stress [32]
  • 􏰀  cautiousness [32]
    Steele and Plenty (2015) defined intercultural communication competence as “one’s knowledge of appropriate communication practices as well as effectiveness at adapting to the surroundings in a communication situation.”                        1) T. Lázár University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Zoetermeer NL

19-01-2019

 

Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some Sources of Misunderstandings in Intercultural Business Communication-1 1)

T. Lázár
University of Debrecen Faculty of Economics and Business, lazar.timea@econ.unideb.hu

Abstract. It is always a big challenge for all types of companies anywhere in the world to survive in the globalised and accelerated world. Their primary objective is to stay competitive, keep or even enlarge their market share while keeping their costs at a minimum level. These corporations often cross borders and operate on a multinational level. In order to do that successfully they need flexible workforce: people who have a high level of intercultural competencies and can help their corporations to achieve their aim of profit maximising. It is widely accepted that culture and languages are among the most significant impacts on intercultural communication. In this paper first I am going to interpret intercultural communication and the role of culture and then look at different intercultural skills and the role of languages in intercultural communication. Some areas that might cause problems in intercultural business communication will also be described.

Introduction

In order for any company to survive in our globalised and accelerated world, a multitude of challenges must be faced on a daily basis. A company’s primary objective is to stay competitive;to retain or even enlarge market share while keeping costs at a minimum. Indeed, a company can be competitive only by reinventing itself, through the use of new forms of business, by forming alliances to cut costs and by enlarging the customer base. In the business world, change happens so fast that companies must be flexible and able to adapt at all times. In some cases, business organisations are forced to cross borders and operate on a multinational level. In order to succeed, they need flexible workforces, i.e. people who have intercultural competencies and capable of assisting them to achieve their business objectives [36]. Business communication in such organisations must accommodate workers coming from different cultural backgrounds, possessing intercultural communication skills which allow them to act successfully on the international level. Such employees either work in multinational teams, take part in multinational business meetings and negotiations or go on assignments to other countries. Proper knowledge of the cultures and foreign languages such employees will meet and use will shape the ways in which they either master or fail in their intercultural communication situations [38]. In this paper, I discuss intercultural communication and the role of culture, examining different intercultural skills and the role of languages in intercultural communication. I also describe specific areas that cause problems in intercultural business communication.

1) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317999851_Some_Sources_of_Misunderstandings_in_Intercultural_Business_Communication

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Zoetermeer, 10-01-2019

Führung im Wandel-3

 

 

1) www.youtube.com/watch?v=01b78hJcME

 

Führung im Wandel-3

Führung ist angegriffen, sie erlebt – um mit den Worten vom Imperator in Star Wars zu reden – eine starke Erschütterung der Macht. Diese These vertrat Prof. Dr. Peter Kruse auf der Messe Zukunft Personal Mitte September 2013 in Köln. ManagerSeminare-Chefredakteurin Nicole Bußmann traf den eloquenten Quer- und Vordenker zum Gespräch über die Herausforderungen für Führung.

 

Nicole Bußmann: Warum ist das Thema Führung derzeit so virulent?

 

Peter Kruse: Ich spüre eine starke Erschütterung der Macht. Wir haben eine Situation, wo wir die Rahmenbedingungen für Führung gesellschaftlich gewaltig geändert haben. Man muss sich das einfach klarmachen. Wir haben auf der einen Seite globalisiert. Das war eine starke Erweiterung alter Kontexte. Mit Global Sourcing und allem, was dazu gehört. Dann haben wir, und das war der eigentliche Teil, mit dem Internet und insbesondere mit den Social Media eine völlig neue Vernetzungsdichte erzeugt. Das heißt wir sind hingegangen und haben ein System erzeugt, in den wir eine maximale Zahl von Beteiligten haben. In dem wir viel Spontanaktivität haben und eine hohe Vernetzungsdichte. Wann immer, wenn man solche Systeme erzeugt, können Sie sicher sagen, dass diese Systeme eine Tendenz zur Nicht-Linearität haben. Sie schaukeln sich auf. Das heißt wir haben plötzlich eine Situation, in der Dinge passieren, die ich nicht vorhersagen kann. Und da sind wir an dem Punkt! Wenn Führung sich darüber normalerweise definiert, Vorhersagen zu machen, Angaben zu machen, zu sagen: „Da geht’s hin, tue da, lass jenes“ , dann wird es sehr schwer, wenn ich selber die Komplexität, die entsteht, nicht überblicke. Und dann rutschen wir sozusagen auf Führungsseite in eine mehrfache Herausforderung. Die erste Herausforderung ist, wenn man so will, eine Komplexitätsfalle. Das heißt wir haben auf der einen Seite ein System, das immer mehr Komplexität erzeugt, und auf der anderen Seite einen immer geringeren Planungshorizont. Wir können immer weniger genau sagen, was passieren wird. Wenn diese Schere zu weit auseinander geht, dann spüren alle Beteiligten, dass Führung nicht mehr Richtung geben wird. Und damit geraten wir in ein Legitimationsproblem hinein. Wir müssen plötzlich erklären: Warum kriege ich mehr Geld als Du? Wenn Du mich fragst, wo geht die Reise hin, dann werde ich sagen: „Wir werden mal gucken.“ Das ist ein bisschen schwierig! Weil wir mit dieser Komplexität umgehen müssen, ist das Zweite passiert: Wir haben gelernt, dass die individuelle Intuition, das individuelle Wissen nicht mehr reichen. Die Vordenker sind nicht mehr der gefragte Teil. Wir müssen gemeinschaftlich mal herausfinden, worum es sich in einer bestimmten Situation geht und wo die Reise hingeht. Dafür nutzen wir wieder Netze! Also: Wenn wir auf der einen Seite eine vernetzte Welt haben, müssen wir uns , um Antworten zu geben, immer mehr vernetzen. Und damit erzeugen wir noch mehr Komplexität. Und die Netzwerke haben zudem die Eigenschaft, die Macht zu übernehmen. In einem Netzwerk, ist nicht derjenige, der etwas gibt, der Sender,  bedeutungsvoll, sondern derjenige, der empfängt.

Es ist der Nachfrager, der entscheidet, was richtig ist. Das heißt, in Netzwerken haben wir die zweite große Herausforderung für Führung, nämlich eine Machtverschiebung. Die Macht verschiebt sich von dem Anbieter auf den Nachfrager.  Das war im Markt schon schwer zu ertragen. Und das ist intern genauso schwer zu ertragen. Führung ist in diesem Sinne angegriffen.

 

Und das ist der dritte Teil der Herausforderung: Wir haben eine Situation, in der wir allein nicht mehr intellektuell und fachlich und sachlich nicht mehr klarkommen. Wir müssen kooperieren. Und wenn wir diese Kooperation in Netzwerken immer weiter betreiben, dann lösen wir insbesondere bei Wertekooperation, sehr schnell die Firmengrenzen auf. Oder bei horizontaler Kooperation die Strukturgrenzen: irgendwelche Abteilungen arbeiten mit einander. Da finden plötzlich andere Dinge statt. Und an dem Punkt stellt sich dann die Frage: Was ist der identitätsstiftende Systemrahmen? Ist das tatsächlich noch das Unternehmen? Ist das noch meine Führungskraft? Hole ich mir meine Identität daraus, dass ich sage: „Ich arbeite bei Dir? Oder hole ich mir meine Identität nicht viel mehr aus der Frage. „Warum arbeite ich?“

Was ist der Sinnzusammenhang, in dem ich arbeite? Wenn nicht viel mehr in Netzwerkstrukturen als im Unternehmen. Hier ist die Rede von der Identitätsfrage.Und damit haben wir das dritte Problem für Führung.

 

Nicole Bußmann: Und wie gehen Ihren Erfahrungen nach Führungskräfte damit um? Mit diesen Herausforderungen? Spüren sie diese überhaupt?

 

Peter Kruse: Oh, das zumindest kann man sagen. Spüren tun das alle. Und wenn man dort ehrlich zusammensitzt, gibt es Aussagen wie: „Ich weiß nicht, ob unser Geschäftsmodell noch funktioniert.“ Nehmen wir den Bereich der Telekommunikation. Das ist faszinierend. Da erfindet jemand in Silicon Valley eine Möglichkeit wie What’s app. Ich kann plötzlich die  sms über eine Internetplattform für umsonst. Können Sie sich vorstellen, was für ein Angriff auf so ein Geschäftsmodell bedeutet, wenn man damit jahrelang viel Geld verdient hat! Und dann brechen plötzlich Geschäftsmodelle weg, die man so sicher gesehen hat. Und so geht das dauernd. Die Leute werden, wenn sie gefragt werden, sagen heute dies und morgen das. Und wenn man die dann in einem ehrlichen Gespräch vor sich hat, merkt man auch richtig, wie sie das irritiert. Dass sie an dem Punkt offen sind mit der Aussage: „Richtig wissen, wo die Reise hingeht bei allen strategischen Planungen, bei allem, was wir da tun, so richtig wissen wir es nicht.“ Und dann die Frage: „Wie geht man mit der Erwartungshaltung um, die einem entgegengebracht wird?“ Diese Art von stabilisierender Führung ist nicht nur ein Problem dessen, der führt, sondern auch häufig dessen der geführt werden will.  Das heißt die Anforderung kommt von bottom-up: „Sag mir doch mal, wo es lang geht.“ Und das dann auch noch in einer unheiligen Allianz: „Ich weiß, dass Du das nicht sagen kannst. Ich triggere damit.

„Sag’s es mir doch! Vielleicht auch noch um Dich dann bei dem Fehler zu erwischen und mal ganz böse zu sein auf Führung und heftig bashing machen zu können.“

 

Nicole Bußmann: Führung-bashing ist ein gutes Stichwort. Man hat derzeit das Gefühl, dass gerade in der Öffentlichkeit sehr stark auf den Führungskräften herumgeritten wird. Ist das berechtigt?

 

Peter Kruse: Sagen wir mal so. Wir haben eine ganze Phase, eine Zeit hinter uns, in der Effizienzerhöhung das große Thema von Führung war. Das heißt wir haben in stabilen Situationen das Optimum herausgeholt. Und in dieser Phase hat Führung einen stark strukturierenden Auftrag und ist damit sehr erfolgreich gewesen. Und hat damit viel Geld verdient. Jetzt sind wir in der Situation, dass genau dieser Horizont ins Schwanken gerät. Es geht nicht mehr nur um Effizienzerhöhung, sondern um Innovation! Anderes Thema! Und plötzlich steht man ja da. Und wenn Du dann nicht in der Lage bist, die Zukunft richtig zu beschreiben und zu sagen, wo die Reise hingeht, kommt die Frage: „Warum verdienst Du dann soviel?“ In der Schweiz denkt man darüber nach, ein Volksbegehren zu machen, um die Gehälter zu limitieren. Dann merkt man eigentlich, wie angesäuert das Verhältnis inzwischen ist. Was aber nicht mit persönlichem Bashing zu tun hat. Sondern mit einer Änderung im System. Das heißt wir stehen vor etwas, wo man sagen kann: das hat durchaus die Charakteristik eines Prozessmusterwechsels. Das ist ein Paradigmenwechsel. Da geht es um grundsätzlich Neues. Und das ist eine Systemfrage und nicht eine Frage von persönlicher Fähigkeit oder Unfähigkeit.

 

Nicole Bußmann: Trotz allem müssen die Führungskräfte persönlich reagieren auf die Mitarbeiter, die jetzt geführt werden wollen. Und die Führungskräfte müssen damit umgehen, dass sie Macht verlieren beispielsweise durch die Netzwerke. Wie ist da Ihre Beobachtung? Wie empfinden Führungskräfte das?

 

Peter Kruse: Ich glaube, die haben schon intuitiv den richtigen Weg gefunden. Sie gehen sehr stark auf das Thema Personal Coaching. Das heißt sie bieten eine Beziehung an und sie gehen sehr stark auf das Thema Kultur. Auf die Vereinbarung von stabilisierenden Wertemustern. Wenn schon das operative Doing nicht mehr stabil macht, dann wenigstens die Werteebene. Das heißt ich gehe auf die Ebene einer Resonanz-Attraktivität. Kann ich Dir etwas anbieten, was für Dich attraktiv genug ist, um mir Deine Arbeit zuzuordnen? Es wird als Zwischenlösung auch reichen. Ob das als Dauerlösung reicht, ist eine andere Frage. Weil sich die Leute auf Dauer aus diesem Identitätskontext des Unternehmens vielleicht ein bisschen verabschieden.

 

Nicole Bußmann: Aber Führung über Werte ist ja nicht leicht. Was kommt auf die Führungskräfte zu?

 

Peter Kruse: Das ist ein wenig schwierig, denn  wir sind bei den Intangibles. Bei den schwer zu berührenden Dingen. Das können Sie nicht wie ein Hebel umlegen in eine andere Richtung. Werte sind immer ein Diskursprozess. Das können Sie auch nicht delegieren an die Kommunikationsabteilung. Sie können nicht sagen: „Schreiben Sie mal auf.“ Denn es ist nicht der aufgeschriebene Wert, der am Ende zählt. Sondern es ist der Diskurs über den Wert, der zählt. Kulturen müssen immer wieder aufs Neue entstehen. Kulturen sind ein Lebewesen. Kultur ist ein Aushandlungsprozess zwischen Menschen. Wir müssen Kultur immer wieder ins Leben bringen. Über Werte kann man nicht steuern. Man kann über Werte nur arbeiten, wenn man einen glaubhaften Aushandlungsprozess miteinander macht.

1) www.youtube.com/watch?v=01Lb78hJcME

 

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V. und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis, sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse  dieser Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landesspezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

 

NL  Zoetermeer, 07-09-2018

 

 

 

Führung im Wandel-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Führung im Wandel-2  1)

Zusammenfassung wichtiger Textteile:

Drei mögliche Entwicklungsstufen auf dem Weg in die Zukunft

Roadmap für die Entwicklung „guter Führung“

In der von den 400 interviewten Führungskräften intuitiv beschriebenen Großwetterlage der deutschen Führungskultur zeichnen sich ausgehend von der aktuellen Führungspraxis drei aufeinander aufbauende Entwicklungsstufen „guter Führung“ ab.

Stufe 1:

In der ersten Stufe wechsele der Schwerpunkt des Führungshandelns von Effizienz und Ertrag zu Kreativität und Erneuerung. An die Stelle
von Linienhierarchie, Zielemanagement und Controlling trete die flexible Organisation in dezentralen Teams, die als Treiber von Kreativität, Kooperation und Veränderung fungierten. Geschäftsmodelle würden auf den Prüfstand gestellt. Der Schwerpunkt von Führung verlagere sich von instrumentell gestützten Führungssystemen zu Identitätsbildung, Team- Coaching und Empowerment. Aus Management werde Leadership.

Stufe 2:

In der zweiten Entwicklungsstufe von „guter Führung“ würden die Teamstrukturen zunehmend durch selbst organisierende Netzwerke ergänzt oder ersetzt. Mit der Nutzung sozialer Medien in der Kommunikation innerhalb des Unternehmens und nach außen nehme
der direkte hierarchische Einfluss weiter ab. Die Transformation zum Enterprise 2.0 erhöhe noch einmal deutlich die Selbstbestimmung der Mitarbeitenden und verringere die Kosten der Zusammenarbeit. Die Unternehmensprozesse würden beschleunigt und die Wahrscheinlichkeit kreativer Impulse steige weiter. Ohne eine attraktive Vision und ohne verbindlich vereinbarte Regeln wachse aber das Risiko eines Verlustes an gemeinsamer Ausrichtung. Führung habe nun die Aufgabe, über die Definition von Rahmenbedingungen und die Vermittlung von Sinnzusammenhängen die wachsende Eigendynamik zu kanalisieren und eine Synchronisierung der Aktivitäten sicherzustellen. Führung werde immer indirekter und Führungskräfte bräuchten selbst eine intensive, begleitende Reflexion, um den Anforderungen gerecht zu werden.

Stufe 3:

Eine Konsequenz der Entwicklung sei in der dritten Stufe von „guter Führung“ die Einbettung der Unternehmensaktivitäten in einen stabilisierenden Wertekanon. Aus der „Wert-“orientierung der Shareholder- Value-Perspektive werde die „Werte-“orientierung eines solidarischen Stakeholder-Handelns.

1) https://www.inqa.de/SharedDocs/PDFs/DE/Publikationen/fuehrungskultur-im-wandel-monitor.pdf?__blob=publicationFile

Über Prof. C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V. und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis, sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse  dieser Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landesspezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

NL Zoetermeer, 12-06-2018

How to Design Websites that Communicate Across Culture

How to Design Websites that Communicate Across Culture[1]

 There’s nothing as exciting as the theoretical possibility of reaching tens of millions of people all over the world with one single website.

In reality, chances are that, apart from some global phenomenon, most websites appeal to some countries but don’t appeal to others. Is there a way to create a website which appeals to all these different countries?

The answer is yes. At the very least, there are some basic rules to follow, which will help enhance your website’s chances of attracting readers who speak different languages.

 

1. Define your Website

The worst mistake any content provider can make is to enter different markets with a product which doesn’t have a straightforward personality and hence, doesn’t deliver a clear message. If it doesn’t come across very quickly, that is, what your website is about, it’s quite unlikely that Internet readers from foreign countries will take the time to try to understand it. They will probably just quickly hit the “back” button. As soon as a visitor lands on your website, he/she must be put in the condition of realizing the essence of the website within a mere 30 seconds.

 

2. Define Your Target Markets

Once you know well what your product is, decide which markets to target. If your website is dedicated to French wine or Persian carpets, market research will provide you with precious information like which country your potential readers would be from. Or you can even go in as a pioneer, choosing to enter a market which is traditionally not very receptive to your type of content/product, but make sure that it is an educated risk that you are taking.

 

3. Keep the Language as Simple as Possible

The simpler the language you use on your website, the easier it is to be understood by an international audience. This point applies both to websites in just one language (English, most of the time) or to multi-lingual websites. Straightforward, non-idiomatic English that are not full of lingo or word play will be more accessible to an audience that does not have English as its first or second language. Even in the case of a website which provides multi-lingual versions of the content, a text written in plain English will be translated more easily, and at a lower cost.

 

4. Choose the Right Design

Design implies culture. To get a very quick idea of this simple statement, surf through the different versions of websites of multi-national brands such as the electronics company, Philips. The Dutch website shows a big picture of a northern landscape with soft colours and the presence of a middle-aged man pushing a bike in a park with a relaxed smile on his face: the message is one of tranquillity and a sense of wellbeing.

On the contrary, the Japanese version features two small Facebook icons on either side of the screen and a small central picture with a young Asian man wearing a white shirt and tie, holding an electric razor in a pose which communicates urban dynamism, determination and tight schedules.

 

5. Choose the Right Color

The choice of the right colour for a website is an important matter. We all know very well how colors can influence our instinctive reaction to places, products, even people. We know very well that, for example, many banks choose a blue background for their brand because it communicates a sense of trust. At the same time, we wouldn’t paint our bedroom black or bright red because we are aware that these are not colours which help us to relax, to say the least.

But when it comes to designing a website which has to tackle international markets, there are more considerations to be take in. Different colours have different meanings to different cultures. For example, while black in western countries is a sign of death, evil and mourning, in China it is the colour of young boys’ clothes. On the other hand, while white in Western culture represents marriage, peace, and medical help or hospitals, in China it stands for death and mourning. So, picking the right colour is not just a matter of appearance, it’s a matter of implicit messages and content.

 

6. Translation and Lengths

Targeting other countries with your website very often means providing your content in at least one other language.

In this case there are a number of important choices to make. The first and possibly the most important one, regards the type of translation: electronic versus human translator. The first choice comes with two great advantages: it’s quick and it’s free. Just download Google Chrome, a browser which features a built-in translation bar at the top of the page, and click “Translate”. The drawback, however, is that mistakes and involuntary humour are a concrete risk. A (good) translator rules out these problems but might affect your costing.

However, there are less expensive options, such as the freelance portals www.peopleperhour.com or the translation website www.proz.com which offer translating peoples at competitive prices. Another possible solution is to start translating only some parts of your website into the second language, keeping the rest in your main language.

In any case, don’t forget that when content is translated into another language, the length of the text changes. So, keeping text separate from graphics is always a very wise move. For this purpose, I strongly recommend using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which allow the content to be kept separate from page design, and Unicode, the program with which you can switch between over 90 languages and thousands of characters.

A last consideration not to be overlooked is that not every country or every region has a fast broadband connection, so reducing the usage of Flash and heavy graphics to a minimum is recommended.

 

7. Promote your Website Locally

Social media is still the cheapest way to promote a website, but when your target is another country you might be surprised to find out that there are other options besides Facebook and Twitter.

In fact, there are many national top social platforms in various countries which you can use to promote your website on. Take your pick from the world map of Social Networks.

 

8. Mind your Tone

Just one more final small suggestion about communication. Apart from the actual languages, different cultures often use a different tone. An American website is very likely to use a much more approachable and direct style than an Arab or Japanese one.

Since you never know how different people from other countries could react to being addressed too informally, a good way to keep on the safe side is definitely to always be polite and respectful.

 

Conclusion

Keep in mind all of the above-mentioned points and your international adventure will start off on the right foot. When dealing with cross-cultural products, always try to walk in your client’s shoes and be sensitive of their views.

 

Editor’s note: This post is written by Christian Arno for Hongkiat.com. Christian is the founder of Lingo24, a multi-million dollar international translation and localization company with more than a hundred employees in over 60 countries.

 

 



[1] http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/design-websites-that-communicate-across-cultures/

 

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

29-11-2016

Email: beniers@mac.com

 

 

Offene Kommunikation (1)

Offene Kommunikation

Einführung

Berühmt ist die Aussage von Paul Watzlawick: ”Der Mensch kann nicht nicht kommunizieren.”
Man kann nicht nicht kommunizieren, denn jede Kommunikation (nicht nur mit Worten) ist Verhalten und genauso wie man sich nicht nicht verhalten kann, kann man nicht nicht kommunizieren.

Sobald zwei Personen sich gegenseitig wahrnehmen können, kommunizieren sie miteinander, da jedes Verhalten kommunikativen Charakter hat. Watzlawick versteht Verhalten jeder Art als Kommunikation. Da Verhalten kein Gegenteil hat, man sich also nicht nicht verhalten kann, ist es auch unmöglich, nicht zu kommunizieren.


Erfolgreiche Kommunikation zwischen Menschen erfordert offene Kommunikation. Und offene Kommunikation gestaltet man u.a. mit Hilfe der Dialogführung. Viele Leute gehen dabei von der Annahme aus, dass der Dialog dazu dient, Argumente auszutauschen. Das ist aber nicht der Fall. Der Dialog dient nicht zum Argumentieren, sondern zur Informationsvermittlung. Bekanntlich fängt Kommunikation mit Menschen aus anderen Kulturen mit Informationsvermittlung an. Erst später (wenn man sich besser kennt und wenn ein gewisses Vertrauensklima vorhanden ist) geht man gegebenenfalls zum Argumentieren über.
Die Praxis zeigt, dass interkulturelle Dialogführung, das heißt verbale und/oder nonverbale Informationsvermittlung zwischen Menschen aus unterschiedlichen Kulturen, zu (gravierenden) Missverständnissen führen kann. Es gibt bekanntlich große Unterschiede in der Art der Informationsvermittlung zwischen Kulturen, wie zum Beispiel zwischen aktiven und reaktiven Kulturen, zwischen individualistischen und kollektivistischen Kulturen und zwischen Low-Kontext- und High-Kontext-Kulturen. Darum beschäftigen wir uns in diesem Kapitel u.a. mit dem Phänomen des Dialogs.

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers
Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

01-03-2015
Email: info@beniers-consultancy.com

Vertrauen im interkulturellen Kontext

Menschen mit einem Höchstmaß an Selbstvertrauen gehen elastischer selbstsicher vor. Sie zweifeln nicht an sich selbst und handeln, denken meistens zielorientiert. Das Wahrnehmen, Denken, Urteilen und Handeln dieser Menschen ist selbstverständlich von ihrer eigenen Kultur geprägt.
Menschen aus Fremdkulturen erzeugen eher erwartungswidriges Verhalten, bedürfen der besonderen Aufmerksamkeit, Rücksichtnahme und Beachtung und sind im allgemeinen unberechenbar in ihren Verhaltensweisen. Fremde müssen sich das Vertrauen erst ”verdienen” und ”erarbeiten”, indem sie sich die Werte und Normen der anderen Kultur entsprechend verhalten und diese internalisieren.
Es ist zu erwarten, dass in kollektivistischen Kulturen andere Regeln des Vertrauensaufbaus beachtet und andere Leistungen zur Vertrauensstärkung erbracht werden müssen sowie Vertrauenssicherung und Vertrauensfestigung andere Arten der Investition erfordern als in individualistischen Kulturen.
Menschen aus Kulturen mit hoher Unsicherheitsvermeidung werden von Menschen aus anderen Kulturen ein höheres Maß an Vertrauensaufbau erwarten.
Personen im Auslandseinsatz messen dem Thema des Vertrauensaufbaus große Bedeutung zu. Denn gerade unter fremdkulturellen Handlungsbedingungen wächst die Unsicherheit bezüglich des richtigen, das heißt kulturadäquaten Verhaltens. Außerdem herrscht in derartigen Situationen ein hoher Grad an Orientierungsunklarheit, Intransparenz und Verunsicherung, was man durch die Betonung von Vertrauen (Risikominimierung, Reduzierung von Komplexität, Herstellung von Informationsklarheit und Handlungssicherheit zu bewältigen versucht.
Interkulturelle Begegnung und Kooperation sind besonders im Anfangsstadium mit einem hohen Maß an Intransparenz, Verunsicherung und Orientierungsverlust und subjektivem Kontrollverlust belastet. Zielhandlungen, Handlungsabläufe, selbstverständliche, bislang keiner Beachtung mehr bedurfter Routineabläufe werden gestört, unterbrochen, behindert usw. und erfordern dadurch eine gesonderte Steuerung, Kontrolle, wiederholte Aufmerksamkeit, bewusste Planung und Initiierung. In dieser schwierigen und unüberschaubaren, oft spannungsgeladenen Situation soll zugleich ein erfolgreicher Vertrauensaufbau zum Partner, zu dessen sozialen Umfeld und zum eigenen Lebensumfeld geleistet werden. Im günstigsten Fall wird diese Arbeit mit Behutsamkeit, Vorsicht und einem hohen Maß an eigenkulturell geprägter sozialer Kompetenz angegangen. Der Handelnde bemüht sich, mit SensibilitUat, Empathie und hoher Aufmerksamkeit sein eigenes Verhalten und das seines Partners zu steuern und zu kontrollieren.

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

25-05-2014

Email: info@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: http://www.beniers-consultancy.com

  • Categories

  • Archiv